The Benefits of Folic Acid in Spinal Cord Research

Research

One of the major demands the world has always had is for newer, more effective medicine and treatments.  Many new discoveries in medicine have lead to newer drugs and antibodies that will vastly improve people’s quality of life.  Needless to say, there is both a global demand for an ability to create a better cure […]

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Patenting the Human Genome

Research

There are currently patents for 20% of the human genome.  Almost half of known cancer genes have been patented (Scientific American). The DNA Patent Database is available to the general public, and provides the full-text of patents at no cost. Background A landmark case in the genome project was Amgen vs Genetics Institute in the […]

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Clinical Trials and Your Safety

Research

The National Institute of Health (NIH) defines a clinical trial as a biomedical or behavioral research study of human subjects designed to answer specific questions about biomedical or behavioral interventions (drugs, treatments, and devices.) The FDA and the Office of Human Research Protection (OHRP) regulate clinical trials.  An Institutional Review Board (IRB) reviews study-related documents, […]

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Antimicrobial Resistance

Research

Microbes cause disease, and include bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites.  In the last century great strides in medicine were made in combating diseases caused by microbes.  Antimicrobials have increased human life expectancy and decreased the ability of microbes to cause disease.  Disease conditions that used to be fatal are now easily treated with antimicrobials. Unfortunately […]

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Minimally Invasive Surgery

Research

Within the last few years, a paradigm shift has occurred in the operating room:  surgeons no longer need to directly touch or even see what they are operating.  Endoscopic video imaging and advanced in instrumentation have converted open surgeries to endoscopic ones.  This has resulted in higher survival rates, fewer complications, and a quicker return […]

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Overview on Gene Therapy

Research

Human DNA codes for the expression of everything from hair color to metabolism to genetic disorders.  DNA with mutations causes some of these disorders.  Gene therapy replaces or repairs these mutations, by providing “correct” DNA that is attached to a vector.  A vector is a vehicle for the DNA that is put together by researchers.  […]

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Virtual Colonoscopy

Bowel Disease

Colorectal cancer is the second-leading cause of cancer death in the United States, and the third most common cancer.  Despite its prevalence and morbidity, most people forego colonoscopies because the procedure is uncomfortable and invasive. A virtual colonoscopy may increase the number of screenings as a more favorable alternative, however it is not painless. Accuracy […]

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Diabetic Foot Neuropathy

Diabetes

People with diabetes are at an increased risk for foot injury due to decreased sensation and increased blood sugar levels.  For people with diabetes, the risk of developing a diabetic foot ulcer ranges from 15- 25% (AMA).  Thirty percent of diabetics over 40 years of age develop lower extremity disease, which includes peripheral arterial disease, […]

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Acute and Rapid HIV Testing

HIV AIDS

Most individuals who are infected with HIV develop antibodies within three months of being infected.  The two most common tests for HIV, the Western Blot (WB) and immunofluorescent assay (IFA), confirm HIV by testing for the presence of such antibodies. The rapid HIV tests, such as the Reveal HIV-1 Antibody Test and OraQuick Rapid HIV-1 […]

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Methods for Treating Coronary Artery Disease

Heart Disease

Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a result of plaque buildup in the arteries supplying blood to the heart.  The buildup begins when a part of the artery is damaged, and a plaque forms to heal the site. Then, excess triglycerides and cholesterol attach to the plaque and form a blockage. Coronary artery disease is the […]

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An Overview on Triglycerides

Heart Disease

Triglycerides are a type of fat (lipid) obtained from the diet or produced by the liver, and are a source of energy.  Whenever you eat, your body puts some calories into the bloodstream to use for energy immediately.  The excess calories are converted into triglycerides by the liver, and then travel to be stored as […]

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Exercising your way to Heart Health

Heart Disease

According to the American Heart Association, physical activity increases HDL levels (the “good” cholesterol) in some people.  A high HDL cholesterol level reduces risk for heart disease.  “Physical inactivity is a major risk factor for disease.” Age, sex, race, and genetics all play a role in a person’s metabolism.  The amount of exercise required varies […]

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The Important Facts on Cholesterol Lowering Drugs

Heart Disease

Our bodies need cholesterol to form cell membranes, to help break down some dietary fats, and for some hormones.  Our liver is capable of making all the cholesterol we need, but we also consume cholesterol when we eat animal products (egg yolks, whole milk, and red meat) and saturated fats.  Our bodies can use this […]

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Cholesterol: Genetics and Risk Factors

Heart Disease

Cholesterol is a wax-like substance needed for cell membranes and some hormones. High levels of cholesterol are linked to coronary artery disease and heart attacks (myocardial infarction). Cholesterol is carried through the blood on lipoproteins.  The two most common lipoproteins are high-density (HDL) and low-density (LDL).  HDL is “good” cholesterol because it is believed to […]

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Reputable Research on Alzheimer’s Disease

Alzheimers

Government Agencies The National Institute on Aging is a branch of the National Institute of Health.  Its authority is granted by Congress, and conducts aging research, training, and health information dissemination.  The NIA website has a section on Alzheimer’s disease, including the causes, risk factors, symptoms, diagnosis, treatments, and research.  Some information is available in […]

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Kidney Transplant or Dialysis-Which is Right for Me?

Kidney Disease

Government Agencies The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, a branch of the National Institute of Health, is an excellent resource for kidney disease information.  The website provides information on transplantation, hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services provides this PDF for people on emergency dialysis, and this […]

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